How Barriers can be used effectively in car parks

Sometimes the strongest of solutions come in the simplest of forms. When it comes to creating a safe, secure, and well-transitioned car park – barriers play a critical role, Let’s take a look in detail at how barriers can be used effectively in car parks.
Site owners know that access control is incredibly important when it comes to managing car parks. Ensuring that traffic can flow easily, but still be monitored and managed responsibly is essential to providing a positive experience for visitors. After all, a car park that is unsafe or outdated is likely to be unappealing to drivers, and lead to dwindling numbers and uptake.

Managing entry points

One of the most effective ways to manage that traffic is through the use of an automated barrier system installed at entry points. Automatic barriers require electricity to operate, they are built to high specifications and are difficult for criminals to bypass.

In public settings, barriers can be used to slow down traffic and ensure that payment procedures are adhered to, and in private settings, they can help prevent unauthorised vehicles from entering your site. Equally, they can be used to partition specific areas of a car park for staff or delivery vehicles. Automatic barriers require no manpower and can be operated through an array of different entry configuration methods: granting movement through tokens, tickets, pins, or codes.

An experienced provider will be able to design a system that fits the particular needs of your site. This means taking into account the type of car park that you operate, be it public or private, the availability of staff and manned guards, the type of vehicles that need access to your site, the availability of electricity, and the space that you have to work with. This ensures that you are given recommendations bespoke to your business, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach that could provide you with headaches later on down the line. They will also be able to provide you with maintenance and support when you need it.

Additional equipment

We take a holistic approach to site security and there are times when car parks may require additional equipment in order to strengthen their facilities. One such piece of equipment that can greatly benefit car parks is our new ANPR (automatic number plate recognition) System.

With direct access to a specialist server, our access GUARDIAN ANPR can identify vehicles that are either whitelisted or blacklisted and grant permissions on those basis. It can control flow to private areas, blacklist troublesome vehicles, and save money on staffing. Equally, it can be used to monitor staff from an HR perspective and clock entry and exit times.

For car parks where overstays and unauthorised long-term parking issues have become problems then another option may be height-restrictor barriers. These prevent access for particularly high vehicles such as lorries or caravans. Find out more here.

Gateway Automation provides a range of perimeter security systems to help businesses and individuals to secure their sites. We also provide nationwide servicing and repairs to gates, access control equipment, barriers, and other perimeter security equipment too.
To find out more, contact us on 01522 68255 or take a look at our brochure here

Questions to ask when choosing physical security

SecurityIf you’re reading this blog; then the chances are that you have identified perimeter security as an area of your business that needs to be addressed. Like many businesses, you may be concerned about the massive derailment of operations that can result from a serious security breach. If this is the case then read on to discover how perimeter security is fundamental to safeguarding your income, reputation, and peace of mind. And importantly, what questions you should ask when discussing your needs with a provider.

Whether in the middle of a recession, or in times of prosperity, crime remains a constant source of worry for many businesses up and down the UK. Even the most minor security breaches can result in repairs, losses of income, delays to operations, and can be a detriment to the confidence of customers and shareholders.

What is perimeter security?

Perimeter security entails the protection of your buildings and assets through the deployment of tools and equipment designed to limit access, deter criminals, and ultimately safeguard your property. However, before you begin planning, or reviewing your current measures, you should ensure that you have a good understanding of which measures will be right for your business.

How is my business different?

One size doesn’t always fit all. One of the most common sources of headaches for businesses that we discover in conversation comes from a lack of personalisation. Without a proper understanding of their operations, owners may be “upsold” to products that are either not suited to their particular type of business, or that they don’t need at all. This is why you should always seek out an experienced supplier and discuss with them how your business works and what needs you have. Afterall, no one knows your business as well as you.

What are my current security protocols?

It is rare to find a business that hasn’t at least invested in some rudimentary forms of physical security. However, there may be blind spots in your current blueprints that need to be addressed. It is important to identify weaknesses in your current strategy, as this is exactly what criminals will aim to do. If you can beat them to the mark, then you stand a good chance of deterring them from ever trying to take advantage.

How up to date are my current measures?

Like owning a car or a computer, security measures sometimes need to be reviewed and replaced. While products may be well built, time can wear on some, and repairs might be required to maintain their effectiveness. Equally, advances in technology may mean that your current measures are now outdated and need to be upgraded with advancements such as biometrics.

How do I build a strong perimeter?

To adequately protect your business, you need to start from the outside in. In the same way that castles would rely on drawbridges to keep safe, you too need to consider your entry and exit points.

Gates are one of the strongest forms of physical security out there and offer up both a physical and mental barrier that can upset criminal plans. Installed with thought and care, and given proper levels of maintenance – swing gates, sliding gates, and bi-folding gates should be a cornerstone of any physical security approach. Other fundamentals of external security include security posts, bollards, and outdoor turnstiles which provide effective solutions in specific environments.

How do I manage vehicular access?

Unwanted vehicles can be another sore point for some businesses. This may come in the form of unwanted heavy goods vehicles, caravans, or other unauthorised visitors. At the same time, vehicles can be a powerful tool for criminals, allowing them to use brute force to enter sites, or providing them with means of escape.

To combat this, businesses can employ a range of measures. Height restrictor barriers are often seen in car parks to block access to specific types of vehicles, while allowing permitted ones to enter. Security posts offer versatility in blocking access at specific times of the day, such as when your business is closed. Elsewhere, speed ramps can be used to reduce traffic speed, and automatic rising kerbs can be used to inhibit access in a formidable way.

What about internal security?

While a great amount of thought is often put into external security, there is an ever-growing need to address internal measures. In specific sites, entry may be granted freely, which means that there is a risk of visitors obtaining access to areas that need to be restricted. Equally, you may have high-value assets that need to be accessible by specific staff members only. Adopting tools like turnstiles and access control equipment can be a good place to start.

How do I know I’m making the right choice?

A quality supplier should leave you with no doubts about the options available to your business, and which tools should be used in cracking down on crime. A comprehensive risk assessment can be undertaken to address weaknesses and advise on the best course of action.

Here at Gateway Automation we provide you with a free, no-obligation risk assessment, feasibility survey, and quotation process free of charge. We also provide a nationwide reactive callout service with engineer response times of 8 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. This means any problems can be addressed in a timely fashion, and disruption can be kept to a minimum.

For more information on any of the security options above, or for further advice on how to protect your business premises from criminals, please contact us here or call us on 01522 682 255.

What to Consider when Buying Barriers

Gateway BarriersIf you’ve decided it’s time to upgrade your security systems at your site, then one of your first ports of call should be perimeter security. One essential component of site security that should always be considered when enquiring about upgrades is a barrier. Here is what to consider when buying barriers.

Why invest in barriers?

A simple but effective solution, barriers are, when used the right way, are a highly effective tool in preventing crime. They deter opportunists and leave them with no doubts that your business takes things seriously. Barriers ensure that you have control over who can access your site, and when they can do so. Allowing you either to automatically, or with the help of manned personnel, control entry to your premises. However, while you may have already heard enough to interest you in a barrier, there are some important factors to consider before making a purchase.

Level of Security needed

One of the first questions you need to ask yourself is with regards to the level and robustness of security that is needed at your site. While for some businesses security needs are understandably at the very top of their agenda, some businesses have other agendas to balance. For instance, a site that receives heavy traffic might require a different type of barrier to one which is only occasionally accessed. Equally, you may be a business that wants to balance its security needs with a friendly and welcoming environment.

Automatic or Manual?

A second consideration is whether you require automatic barriers or manual. They each are suitable in different situations. Automatic barriers require electricity in order to operate, so somewhere isolated may prefer to install manual barriers, particularly if electricity access is restricted. Additionally, your business may prefer, for security or logistical reasons, to have a manned manual barrier in place over an automatic barrier.

While manual barriers are often preferred in more rural settings, automatic barriers do offer many specialised benefits. Automatic barriers are more difficult for criminals to bypass and overhaul which makes them a particularly reliable choice.  They can be enhanced with access control equipment and also provide support to businesses who do not have the budget or manpower to physically attend a manual barrier and provide access to visitors. Automatic barriers are often found at parking facilities, checkpoints, and for other types of restricted areas.

Height Restriction

Height restrictor barriers are another popular choice. Especially for car parks and service stations where the risk of overstays and unauthorised long-term parking issues. They are also great for where you need to prevent access to high vehicles. They are also a welcome addition to areas where automatic barriers are either not cost-effective, or not required.

Cost

Cost is always a key consideration for businesses and understandably it is important to make sensible decisions to match your budgets. Businesses should take part in a feasibility study before making a decision on which products to choose. This will help ensure you are recommended the best solutions to match your needs. Not only can you be confident that you’ve picked the right product, but you are also protected against criminal activity.
Gateway Automation provides a range of perimeter security systems to help businesses and individuals to secure their sites. We also provide nationwide servicing and repairs to gates, access control equipment, barriers, and other perimeter security equipment too. To find out more, contact us on 01522 68255 or take a look at our brochure here: http://www.gatewayautomation.co.uk/brochure/.

University Campus Security Challenges

University campusUniversity campus security can be a difficult challenge to overcome. With hundreds of students coming and going around campus, it is crucial that sufficient security measures are in place. Here we discuss some of the best ways to approach campus security challenges and what measures should be enforced.

STEP 1: Define the problem & Identify Potential Issues

Before investing in more security solutions, it is of upmost importance that all potential threats are considered. The region and demographics of the campus and threat type should be considered. Identify the trends you are experiencing before thinking about which security measures will be best for each of them.

STEP 2: Implement Security Measures

Here are just some of the methods which have proven to be successful for improving university campus security. Use the information you have collated from step one to tackle the campuses specific problems and risks.

•    Access Control– Using access control has been proven to be an effective form of security on campus. Each student usually has an ID badge which provides them access to specific buildings. These not only help identify students, they can provide a sense of protection. An electronic visitor management system should also be considered to keep track of all visitors and people on campus.

•    Turnstiles-Turnstiles can be extremely effective, especially when teamed up with access control equipment. Having these together, can stop the risk of tailgating and help ensure that only authorised people can enter.

•    Bollards– Bollards can successfully protect both vulnerable buildings from damage but also protect pedestrians. Having bollards strategically located throughout the campus can help reduce the risk of accidents from vehicles as they do not allow cars to enter and helps indicate to students and staff where the designated pedestrian areas are with ease.

    Sufficient Lighting– There have been many studies that highlight the importance of lighting as a security measure. Not only does sufficient lighting automatically make people feel safer, but the light also helps identify any criminals or potential criminals more easily when caught on CCTV and can help act as a deterrent.

   Barriers- Barriers at the entrances of University campuses can be extremely effective. Especially if they are teamed up with manned security. Having these measures in place from the beginning helps ensure the correct people are let on to campus.

    Training Courses- Although all the measures mentioned above can be successful, it is crucial that everyone is aware of these security measures and understand the importance of them. Therefore students and staff alike should have security training courses if possible to help them stay safe as well.

STEP 3: Measure effectiveness and continue to measure and adapt

Once you have adopted a strategy the work has not finished. To ensure that it will continue to be effective you must measure the results. If the results are negative, amend your strategy accordingly. Building a university campus that is as safe as possible is a continuous process and will always be adapting and changing.

Here we have discussed the steps needed to approach campus security challenges. A combination of security measures will ensure a 360 holistic security approach that can be extremely robust. However, the important thing to remember is to always measure the impact these security methods have and change and amend wherever necessary.

What’s Next?

To find out more about how security can be used successfully on an University campus , please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no-obligation quotation and feasibility survey to assess your perimeter security equipment.

Securing Building Sites- Using Physical Security

Danger Keep Out sign Securing building sites is a hot topic in the construction industry. Building sites are a common target for vandals and thieves. They can be targets for homeless people as well as kids who view building sites as an adventure playground. It is because of these potential intruders that construction companies must ensure that building sites are as secure as they can be.

Here, we discuss the best ways to achieve this.

Install Perimeter Security

Installing perimeter security is one of the easiest and most effective ways of securing building sites. Ensure any fences or gates are sufficiently high enough to make it difficult for people to climb over. Also ensure there are no gaps beneath the barriers, fences and gates to avoid anyone crawling underneath.

Keep entrances to a minimum

Building sites are easy targets to thieves as it can be difficult to keep track of visitors and contractors. Maintain control over who is entering and exiting the site by limiting the number of entrances and exits.

Install CCTV

Although installing cameras can be expensive, they can be very effective and means that site managers always have visibility of the site. Always post signs when CCTV is in operation. It informs people that they are on camera but also acts as a secondary deterrent if the message is reinforced through clear signs.

Layer security with signage

Although extremely low cost, having signage that is prominent around the site can be extremely effective and adds another layer of security. Even though the signs alone do not prohibit unauthorised personnel, they have been proven to be an effective deterrent. They can be a weak form of security when used alone, but placing them together with other forms of security can help to secure a building site.

Use security lighting

Wherever possible, use security lighting to deter anyone from entering. The security lights are motion censored and can deter people from entering, especially at night time. If any intruders successfully enter the premises, the security lighting can help them be identified.

Consider manned security

Lighting may not always be an option. However, if your building site is in a high-risk area, consider manned security. They can carry out regular patrols to limit any attempted arson, theft or vandalism. Alarm systems could be used instead of or alongside managed security to increase the protection even further. You can choose between loud alarms, designed to shock the intruder or a silent alarm that will contact the police.

Supervise Visitors

It is imperative that all visitors to the building site are supervised at all times. They should be provided with the appropriate safety gear such as hard hats and high-vis jackets.

Organise construction site carefully

Time needs to be spent to ensure the building site remains safe and secure at all times. Stack any building materials safely and not too high to avoid the risk of toppling over. Immobilise all vehicles and always remove the keys from all equipment. Hide as much out of site as possible and secure any substances that may be hazardous. These measures will protect your site from theft and also help reduce the risk of any injuries occurring.

Not only can weak security lead to theft or vandalism which can cause businesses insurance claim headaches. It can cause potential delays to a project and can even cause injury. Regardless of the size of the project, securing building sites should be a top priority for all construction companies. By layering physical and perimeter security, they can have peace of mind that their property remains as safe and secure as possible. By taking these appropriate steps, the risk of damage, loss and injury can be significantly reduced.

What’s Next?

To find out more about how physical security can benefit your business, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no-obligation quotation and feasibility survey to assess your perimeter security equipment.

Data Centre Security- 11 Ways To Secure Data Centres

Server room interiorThe term data centre security conjures images of lines of code, hackers and firewalls. However, there is a huge requirement for physical security within a data centre too.

Data centres are used to house computer systems. They often include backup data, core data, replicated data and on the whole, are huge part of an organisation’s Disaster Recovery Strategy.

In a world where technology impacts many industries, data centres are crucial for businesses and therefore data centres security is a hot topic. Not only should data be protected from potential cyber-attacks, the physical building should be secure.

Cyber security focuses on the prevention of data theft or destruction by malicious attacks; however, this is not enough to ensure your data centre remains safe. The building also has to be protected from physical attacks.

Here, we discuss 11 ways you can physically secure data centres.

1. Use Crash Barriers

Stop unauthorised vehicle entry with the installation of road blockers. These have been designed specifically to prevent the threat of potential intruders or terrorist attacks in high-security areas. Varying in height, these road blockers will restrict the entry of vehicles.

2. Use Bollards

Avoid anything impacting and colliding into the building by installing bollards. Install permanent bollards around the building entrances. Alternatively, you could install adjustable bollards that can be lowered to allow access to authorized vehicles.

3. Limit Entry Points

Where possible, try and limit the possible entry points to only one door. If you require additional fire doors, ensure these extra doors are exit only. Limit exterior door handles to prevent any re-entry.

4. Use Security Cameras

Surveillance cameras should be installed throughout the perimeter of the data centre. Consider installing adequate CCTV signage as this can be a physical deterrent.

5. Hire On-Site Security

Threats can happen at any time. You may consider an additional layer of physical security by hiring on-site staff. Having someone monitoring the site acts as a strong deterrent to intruders and can raise the alarm if they spot any potential issues.

6. Build The Data Centre In The Best Location

Plan the best location for your data centre. If possible, choose a location away from the company’s head office or headquarters.

Ensure the data centre is set back from the main road. Consider using landscaping to help form additional protection as trees can help obscure the building from passers-by. Avoid building data centres in locations that are prone to natural disasters such as in a flood area or an area prone to earthquakes or fires.

7. Plan The Data Centre Carefully

When you design a data centre, avoid unnecessary windows. Build walls that are extremely thick as they work an effective barrier as well as improving thermal insulation.

8. Embrace Biometric Technology

Biometric technology is increasingly popular and is now part of our every day lives. Install biometric identification systems in the building to control access. This is often a fingerprint recognition device. In addition to biometric technology, ensure multi-factor authentication is in place. This method utilises two or more authentication methods. For example, someone may use their fingerprint but will still need to type in a pin code or show an access card.

9. Install Barriers and Gates

Perimeter security is also vital. Have strong fencing around your entire site. Ensure the gates and barriers are placed where surveillance equipment, a guard, or preferably both are in place. Also, use barriers to control which vehicles enter the premises.

10. Use Access Control Equipment

Data centres should adopt a Zero Trust Network. This means that no one is trusted until they can prove who they are. Access control equipment is an important element of implementing this.

While it may seem simple, access lists should also be provided to ensure that only approved individuals can access data centre. Ensure these lists are kept up to date and are stored securely.

11. Install a Sophisticated Alarm System

Alarm systems are costly. However, these costs are outweighed by the potential benefits. Some systems are linked to local police stations or security companies. Others are silent, but trigger alerts to key staff. Whatever the system you choose, it will bring peace of mind.

People value physical security. They trust places that are secure when they can actually see forms of security such as gates, barriers and alarm systems.

Many companies may forget about the physical form of security when it comes to data centres as they are concentrating on the risk of cyber threats. Although cybersecurity is vital and needs to be as sophisticated as possible, teaming this up with physical security can ensure your data centre is as secure as it can be.

As data centres evolve in the future, the need for physical measures will remain vital. However, physical security measures may also evolve. Having a multi-layer approach that considers both physical and cyber elements will ensure the best protection.

To find out more about how data centres can be secured using physical security, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no obligation quotation and feasibility survey to assess your perimeter security equipment.

Securing Empty Property- Commercial Space

Shop to letSecuring empty property can often feel like a waste of money. There’s nothing inside to steal. However, leaving a commercial property vacant for any length of time can be risky. Whether you are having the property renovated or waiting for new occupants, there are some common risks and security measures that you should be aware of.

Here is our guide to securing empty property to ensure your investment remains secure.

1. Reduce Theft

Theft is a main threat for any commercial building left unoccupied. Even if you believe there is nothing to take as the building is empty, there are still many valuable items that thieves tend to target from commercial buildings. Stealing metal-based items for scrap is popular with thieves as lead from roofs, aluminium from heating ducts or copper from wiring can be valuable. Even radiators are regularly stolen as they are often easy to remove from the wall and can be sold on for a good price. Opportunist thieves will not be deterred by a building with little content.

It is not just the stolen materials that commercial property owners need to be concerned about. The theft of these items can lead to damage of the building which will lead to additional costs and potentially more severe issues in the future. For example, removing piping and radiators can lead to leaks, water damage or even pest problems whereas removing the lead from roofs can leave holes in the roof which again could lead to water damage or weather damage. Anything removed from the electrics will also increase the risk of gas leaks or risk of fire.

Although the level of metal theft is decreasing due to legislation updates making it more difficult to sell on metal, it is still a real concern property owners need to be aware of when securing empty property.

2. Stop Arson

Arson is dangerous as not only can it cause significant damage to your property, it can lead to others getting injured as well, especially if there are flammable materials still in the building. It can also quickly spread to surrounding properties and impact other businesses.

If a fire broke out and somebody was injured there may be an investigation into the landlord’s negligence.
Fire should be a concern for any owner looking into securing their empty property.

3. Stop Anti-Social Behaviour

Individuals sometimes break into vacant properties in order to deliberately vandalise the building through graffiti. Although it is relatively easy and cheap to remove it, it doesn’t give off a good image and can lead to other forms of antisocial behaviour. It can also encourage more people to graffiti if some is already visible as it shows that the building is accessible.

Unfortunately, empty commercial buildings can tempt people to use them for a range of anti-social behaviours. From drug use to a temporary toilet, fly-tipping or even dogfighting, the list goes on. Activities like these can quickly cause damage to your property but also impact the surrounding environment and buildings. It can even lead to significant health hazards that you need to be conscious of. Although it is not you that has caused any mess, you will be liable to ensure it is cleaned.

4. Puts an End to Squatting

The law changed in 2012 for squatters of residential properties which made squatting illegal. However, the same rules do not apply for commercial properties. Squatters are defined as people who occupy a property without permission. It remains illegal for people to break into a building, however, if squatters have managed to access the vacant building without causing damage to do so, you will be faced with an even bigger problem. Police can only intervene if damage has occurred.

It is possible to get squatters evicted; however, the process is time-consuming and expensive. In order for it to be done, you would have to go through the civil court system, not the criminal court. This process can be extremely drawn out. During this time, the squatters could be causing damage to your property.

Also consider the land around your property. Illegal occupation can also apply to any land that you own. Some business owners have found travellers on their property.

5. Attract New Business

Having a well-secured commercial property improves the professional appearance. High-security levels can lead to a higher interest in your property. Having a property with broken windows, clear structural damage or graffiti will deter potential tenants.

6. Switch Off Your Utilities

Protect your business by removing anything of potential value. Switch off your gas, electricity and water when the property becomes vacant. This can limit the risk of fires or leaks. Also, prevent access through doors, windows and roofs using boarding. Consider having physical security patrol the building as well as gates and barriers. The more deterrents you implement the better. Plus, having physical security measures as well as CCTV can make a vacant building appear occupied which will be a physical deterrent.

7. Secure all Entry Points to Your Building

To reduce the risk of arson consider boarding up the building with steel screens rather than timber boarding which is flammable.

As a commercial property owner, you have a Duty of Care for anyone entering your property, regardless if you invited them or not. Any injury a person may incur whilst on your property will be your responsibility and increase your liability.
Be proactive as much as possible. Assessing your situation and gain specialist advice.

8. Consider Installing Access Control Systems as an Added Layer of Security

Undertake a health and safety and risk inspection by a professional to gain a full understanding of the risks you need to avoid. Inspect your property on a regular basis. Insurance companies will often want you to check your property at least once a week.

9. Use Perimeter Security around your Plot of Land

Ensure unauthorised vehicles do not access your land by implementing flow plates, barriers or bollards.

Although there will be a cost to protecting an securing empty property, the potential cost saving could be significant. It also gives you the peace of mind that your investment remains as secure as possible at all times.

To find out more about how to protect empty commercial property with physical security, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no-obligation quotation and feasibility survey to assess your perimeter security equipment.

Protecting your business this Christmas

Securing your business at ChristmasMany businesses such as offices, schools and factories are are shut between Christmas and New Year. Although this break is much appreciated by employees, business managers need to ensure that security is up to scratch as it is often during this quiet period that criminals target business premises, they believe to be unoccupied.

Here we discuss some tips that managers should consider in order to ensure their premises remains as secure as possible during this time.

•   Create a procedure in advance for the last day in the office. Nominate and agree an individual to secure the premises. Communicate the plans thoroughly to avoid any mistakes or confusion about what the plan is.

   Keep track of visitors- Christmas, for many establishments is a busy time for guests due to more deliveries for example. Ensure you know who is in your building or premises at all times. Having access control barriers and panels for your building can help ensure no unauthorised vehicles or personnel can access your premises.

•    Decide which key holders will be contactable during the Christmas break- Although the likelihood of them being needed is relatively small, always confirm which members of staff who have keys will be available to deal with any emergencies. Share a list with relevant staff to confirm.

•   Turn off electrical items or put in safe mode. If your premises will be empty during Christmas, carry out thorough checks prior to the break to avoid risk of fire.

•    Check heating settings- Although there will not be anyone in the building, you might want to have the heating on for a short time each day just to ensure its being used regularly. This is especially important is certain stock needs to be temperature control.

•    Consider employing security guards- Depending on your organisation, you may decide if it is worth the investment to have a physical security guard on during the days the office is closed. For many companies this may be unnecessary.

•    Ensure nobody is left on their own- On the last day, try and avoid having one person closing the office or building on their own. It is a lot of pressure for them to remember everything and can also make them vulnerable to any criminals that are watching the premises. If you decide to close early, ensure everyone leaves at the same time.

•    Keep the perimeter well lit- Having strong security lighting is not only protecting your employees during dark mornings and evenings, it is also a good deterrent for potential criminals as it can scare them away but also means any CCTV footage will be clearer.

•    Install barriers, gates and signs- Barriers and gates create a physical barrier that can protect your company but they, along with strong signs such as “CCTV in action” act as a strong deterrent.

•    Do a trial run- You can always do a trial run to ensure all protocols are met. You should also carry out a trial security threat to test reaction times.

The tips above are just some of the ways you can ensure your security levels remain high over Christmas. Of course, these tips and precautions can and should be implemented all year round. Having a permanent high level of security all the time ensures the security remains a part of everyday life and will reduce the vulnerability of your business throughout the rest of the year.

To find out more about how we can help with your business security needs, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no obligation call and feasibility survey to assess your business needs.

How to improve public car park safety

Car Park SafetyPublic carparks can be extremely convenient for people as it provides a secure place for them to leave their car. However, despite the convenience of them, they can in fact be dangerous places. There are a lot of cars and people moving around car parks at any one time and all it takes is one person not paying 100% attention for an accident to happen. As the car park owner, although some things are out of your control, there are many things you can do in order to improve public car park safety. Here we list just some of the safety methods you could implement.

•    Bike Racks– Not only do bike racks provide a convenient additional service for those travelling by bike, the bike racks also act as a physical barrier between cars and pedestrians.
•    Height Bars– A lot of car parks cannot handle the manoeuvring of large vehicles but without a physical deterrent or barrier, you have no control over which vehicles enter the car park. Height restrictors are highly visible and act as a visual deterrent. They also physically stop larger vehicles from entering which will reduce the amount of car incidents you would have if they were not in place.
•    Speed ramps– Having speed bumps or ramps strategically placed throughout the car park will ensure cars are slowed down, allowing more time for all drivers and pedestrians to react.
•    Signage– Ensure you have large, clear signage throughout the car park. Reflective car park signs are a must if your car park is open during dark hours. You need to communicate clearly the rules of the car park, which direction the cars should be driving, what the speed limit is and where pedestrians should cross
•    Parking space protector– Depending on the type of car park you own and who uses it, you may need to keep some spaces reserved. Having parking space protectors can do this. They lock in the up position whilst they are not in use and lower on demand, ensuring unauthorised vehicles cannot park there.
•   Flow control plates– Flow control plates can be great in car parks. They ensure cars enter and exit the correct way, reducing any accidents due to drivers not paying attention.
•   Barriers– Having barriers at the entrance or exit can really help make traffic flow smoothly in and out. You can even have an automated access control system that streamlines this. Next to the barriers you could issue tickets which when re-entered at the exit, will operate the other barrier.
•    Pedestrian only zones– You need to create pedestrian only zones to help improve safety for pedestrians when they are nearby cars. You can indicate where these areas are by using clear signage on the walls and floor and reinforce the areas with bollards so cars cannot access

Whether the car par is at a shopping centre, in a town centre, at a factory or other business, having a carpark that is considered safe and secure is vital. It will in the long run create more business for you and mean your car park will run more efficiently. A lot of the methods mentioned above are value for money as the safety they can provide is priceless.

To find out more about what you can implement to make your carpark safer, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no obligation and feasibility survey to assess your business needs.

4 ways to make your employees feel safe

VLUU L100, M100  / Samsung L100, M100Your employees spend a lot of their time at their workplace, so it is extremely important that they feel as safe as possible when they are there.

Studies have shown that if employees do not feel sufficiently safe at work it can adversely affect staff happiness, productiveness, efficiency and staff retention. There are a lot of things that you, as an employer, can do in order to make your staff feel as safe as possible. The investment you spend in both time and money in these additional security measures will be worth it as it will create a happier workforce that will be more productive. Here are four key areas you can look at in order to improve staff safety.

1.    Invest in gates and barriers
It is a simple thing but having gates can really improve how safe employees feel whilst at work. Creating a barrier using gates acts as a deterrent to anyone who is trying to get onto the premises without permission. Having gates surround the entirety of your property not only indicates to everyone which land belongs to your business, it also protects staff car parks. Having barriers and gates will also help protect your assets (not only your staff but also your stock, the premises itself and sensitive data to name a few) it will also help visitors feel secure when they come for meetings as well.

2.    Have Access Control
Consider having access control areas where you use proximity cards, intercoms or biometric finger print readers to ensure only authorised personnel can enter the premises. These devices are great to have on the entrance of your main building or, alternatively, any room that contains private and important equipment or information. When visitors come, you can provide them with a temporary visitor pass. Not only will this make it convenient for them during their visit, they will also feel secure knowing you need passes to enter the building.

3.    Hire security guards
Sometimes having someone to physically guard your premises can really make your employees feel safe. If you use a security guard alongside barriers, gates and turnstiles, you can ensure only authorised personnel can enter.

4.    Enforce speed limits in staff car parks
The staff car park can be dangerous. If you do not have safety measures in place you could end up with injuries. Ensure you have designated areas for pedestrians which are clear to everyone. Make sure there is sufficient lighting so people can easily get to their cars during winter months. Enforce slow speed limits throughout the car parks using speed bumps and rising kerbs to support this.

Taking time to put some of these methods into practice can really benefit both your business and its employees in the long run. It not only protects your businesses’ valuable items or any sensitive data, it also prevents any serious accidents and increases employee happiness and productivity. Being a company known for having the safety of their employees as a number one priority will also build confidence and trust in your business.

To find out more about what security measures you can put into place for your employees’ safety, please contact us on 01522 682255 for a free, no obligation and feasibility survey to assess your perimeter security equipment.